Charging Of Pmd Rider For Voluntarily Causing Hurt. The Police Will Take Action Against Anyone Who Intentionally Harasses Or Causes Hurt To Others

A 33-year-old Personal Mobility Device (PMD) rider suspected to be involved in a case of voluntarily causing hurt by dangerous means will be charged in court on 11 February 2020.

Investigations revealed that on 29 November 2019, he was riding a PMD on a footpath and had gotten into a verbal dispute with a 72-year-old man. He then used his belt buckle to hit the 72-year-old man, who suffered lacerations on his forehead and was subsequently conveyed conscious to the hospital. The 33-year-old man will be charged in court for voluntarily causing hurt on 11 February 2019. Anyone convicted of voluntarily causing hurt shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, or with fine which may extend to $5,000, or with both.

Since the ban on the use of e-scooters on footpaths commencing 5 November 2019 by the Land Transport Authority (LTA), the Police have observed more cases of fights and harassment arising from confrontations between PMD riders and pedestrians. In one case, five PMD riders who were riding on a footpath hurled vulgarities at an individual who had filmed them and also pushed him from the back, causing him to sustain minor injuries. In another case, a PMD rider was riding on a footpath and rang his bell for a pedestrian to give way. The pedestrian did not do so, and punched the rider after he was stopped from recording a video of the rider.

The Police would like to advise pedestrians and PMD riders to keep the peace and refrain from confrontations. PMD riders are also reminded to adhere to LTA regulations and not ride on unauthorised areas. The Police will investigate all reports and take action against those who intentionally harass or cause hurt to others.

The public can report errant PMD riders (e.g. those who speed, ride recklessly, or on unauthorised areas) to LTA via the MyTransport.SG mobile application. Anyone with information regarding any criminal activity can also report it to the Police via I-Witness (www.police.gov.sg/e-services). Those who require urgent assistance in an emergency should call 999.

Source: Singapore Police Force